TR6

Spen King, father of the Range Rover dies at age 85

Some sad news for the auto world has just surfaced, Charles Spencer King, the father of the modern Land Rover, has passed away. The 85 year-old King died after sustaining injuries in a traffic accident between his bicycle and a van almost two weeks back. King (pictured centre) is widely known for his work leading the team that gave birth to the iconic 1970 Land Rover, beginning a movement that would lead to the current popularity of high-riding, luxury off-road capable vehicles.

King was so pivotal to the Land Rover’s development that the company honored him with a special edition model in 1990 named the Range Rover CSK which was limited to just 200 units. Over his career, King also spent time working on a number of other automotive projects, including the Rover JET1 prototype and the very successful Triumph TR6.

Trimuph TR History – An Evolutionary Sports Car – 06 YB

Like many British car companies, Triumph began with bicycle manufacturing, followed by motorcycle production

Siegfried Bettmann began making his bicycles in 1885, moving to motorcycles in 1902. His motorcycles were so successful that it wasn’t until 1921 that a new factory manager, Claude Holbrook, persuaded him to move into cars. The first light car was built in 1923, with an engine designed by Arthur Alderson of Lea-Francis, to whom Triumph had to pay royalties.

In 1924, Triumph became the first British firm to fit four-wheel hydraulic brakes, although its car manufacturing only took off when it introduced the Super Seven. Stanley Edge designed this car, and had also infl uenced the Austin 7.

Early Troubles

The Depression brought considerable change to Triumph. After large losses, Holbrook took over from Bettman as managing director, and decided to move the company’s products up-market with a new generation of sporting saloons. ‘The Smartest Cars in the Land’ were ready for the 1934 season, powered by four and six-cylinder Coventry-Climax engines, gracefully styled in-house by Walter Belgrove and Frank Warner. But sales didn’t meet expectations and with that, combined with the costs of factory expansion, Triumph was again in trouble. In 1936 the motorcycle business was sold, with Bettman as its chairman.

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Huet Brothers create neo-classic roadster

HB Roadster fq

The Huet Brothers of Holland have created an exciting new vehicle which looks just like an old vehicle. The Dutch duo operates classic rallies and tours across Europe. But having grown up around vintage Alfas and Bugattis, Paul and Tino Huet wanted to recreate something special. The result is the HB Special, a neo-classic roadster with a modern twist inspired by events like the Mille Miglia, Targa Florio and Le Mans, which hosted competitors like the Aston Martin DBR1, Maserati 300 S and Ferrari 412 S.

Based on a Triumph TR6 platform, the HB Special uses carbon-fibre and aluminum to keep the weight down to just 750 kg (1650 lbs). The car is powered by a simple inline-six engine, tuned to produce a modest 180 horsepower. But outright speed isn’t really the point, the HB Special is a modern exercise in classic design. The Huet Brothers plan to produce 12 examples, but they won’t be for sale; they’ll be used for hire in their exclusive HB Experience tours. To complement the car and the experience, the Huet Brothers have crafted a selection of classic motoring accessories, all of which you can check out on their website, by clicking here.

The Huet Brothers of Holland have created an exciting new vehicle which looks just like an old vehicle. The Dutch duo operates classic rallies and tours across Europe. But having grown up around vintage Alfas and Bugattis, Paul and Tino Huet wanted to recreate something special. The result is the HB Special, a neo-classic roadster with a modern twist inspired by events like the Mille Miglia, Targa Florio and Le Mans, which hosted competitors like the Aston Martin DBR1, Maserati 300 S and Ferrari 412 S.

Based on a Triumph TR6 platform, the HB Special uses carbon-fibre and aluminum to keep the weight down to just 750 kg (1650 lbs). The car is powered by a simple inline-six engine, tuned to produce a modest 180 horsepower. But outright speed isn’t really the point, the HB Special is a modern exercise in classic design. The Huet Brothers plan to produce 12 examples, but they won’t be for sale; they’ll be used for hire in their exclusive HB Experience tours. To complement the car and the experience, the Huet Brothers have crafted a selection of classic motoring accessories, all of which you can check out on their website, by clicking here.